WILSON Alfred Dennis  WILSON Alfred Dennis[1]
Male 1900 - 1964

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  • Birth  12 Sep 1900  Pinxton, Derbyshire, England. Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender  Male 
    Died  14 Jan 1964  (1964!)Aspley Lane, Aspley, Nottingham. Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Buried  Wilford Hill, Nottingham Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID  I0128  Hallam, Wilson, Crowder, Harris | Wilson Branch
    Last Modified  22 Apr 2010 
     
    Father  WILSON William Derbyshire,   b. 13 Jul 1861, Pinxton, Derbyshire, England. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Nov 1934, Mansfield, Nottinghamshire, England. Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother  DONNELLY Ann,   b. 14 Jun 1864, Awsworth, Nottinghamshire, England. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Dec 1915, Pinxton, Derbyshire, England. Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  14 Mar 1885  Eastwood, Nottinghamshire, England. Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID  F050  Group Sheet
     
    Family  HARRIS Elsie Hannah,   b. 6 Mar 1902, South Normanton, Derbyshire, England. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Jul 1982, Hawthorns Rest Home, Bestwood, Nottingham. Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  27 Jan 1923  South Normanton, Derbyshire, England. Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Children 
    >1. WILSON Dennis,   b. 25 Dec 1923, Pinxton, Derbyshire, England. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Jun 1996, Clacton on sea, Essex, England. Find all individuals with events at this location
    >2. Living
    >3. WILSON Betty,   b. 12 Oct 1927, Worksop, Nottinghamshire, England. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Jan 2007
    >4. Living
    >5. Living
    >6. Living
    >7. Living
    >8. WILSON Anthia,   b. 10 Oct 1943, Nottingham, England. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Jan 2004, City Hospital Find all individuals with events at this location
    Family ID  F043  Group Sheet
     
  • Photos
    Alfred Dennis Wilson
    Alfred Dennis Wilson
    Status: Located.
     
  • Notes 
    • Pinxton History
      A brief history of Pinxton

      There was a settlement at Pinxton in Anglo Saxon times. The Domesday Book from 1086
      names a village called Snodeswick which is believed to be Pinxton. The lands around
      Pinxton were given to William Peveril by William I. Drogo Fitz Ponce held the manor
      for William Peveril. The name was changed to Ponceston and through the centuries has
      become Pinxton.

      The site was of some strategic value as a castle was built at the top of present Park
      Lane. The castle was abandoned and a new castle was built at Castle Wood near Fulwood
      by the le Wyne family who owned the manor of Pinxton in the 13th century. This was on
      the edge of Sherwood Forest. Traces of the castle can be seen in the walls of the
      church which was built at this time.

      The village seemed to be a quiet place as there are very few references to it in the
      following centuries. Agriculture with some small coalmining enterprises were probably
      all that was carried on until the end of the 18th century when the Industrial
      Revolution caught up with Pinxton. A pack horse road from Nottingham went through the
      village and a toll house was built in about 1640 at Pinxton Green. Tolls were made
      until about until about 1880 and the toll house was demolished in 1938 to improve road
      safety owing to the increase in motor traffic.

      The Cromford canal was opened in 1793. It ran from Arkwrights mill at Cromford down to
      the Erewash Canal at Langley Mill and then onto Pinxton Wharf. Plans were made to
      extend the canal to Mansfield but because of the large number of locks this would have
      entailed over a short distance the plans were abandoned. Instead a horse drawn
      railway was built in 1819 to bring coal and other goods to the canal at Pinxton Wharf.
      The tramway merged with the Midland Railway in 1847 when steam engines were
      introduced. The LNER line with a terminus at Pinxton Wharf was opened in 1872. There
      was much activity at Pinxton Wharf under the heyday of the canal. However subsidence
      was a problem and several roof falls in the Butterly tunnel and problems with keeping
      the water level in the canal at the right level led to its being closed just after the
      turn of the 20th century. The canal basin has been renovated and the area around it is
      a park. The Boat Inn built at the same time as the canal is still there
      (www.fortunecity.co.uk/boozers/elephantandcastle/636/)

      In 1795 John Coke got in touch with William Billingsley of the Derby China Works and
      together they started the Pinxton China Factory which opened in 1796. Billingsley was
      only at Pinxton until 1799 when he left. It was under this period that the finest
      porcelain was fired. Billingsley produced the rose pattern found on much of the
      Pinxton china. After he left the quality of the chinaware deteriorated and the factory
      was closed in 1813 after being in some financial difficulties.

      Mining has been the mainstay of Pinxton industry from the beginning of the 19th
      century until the last pit closed in1968. The first mines where probably of the the
      bell-shaft type and were to be found to the west of the village where the coal seams
      came close to the surface. The lords of the Manor, the Cokes, formed Coke & Co (later
      Pnxton Coal Company) to exploit the coal reserves there. Several shafts were sunk . By
      1890 there were six different pit shafts in the village. All were worked on the
      "butty" system. The population of the village increased in this period from 463
      persons living in 90 houses in 1800 to 943 inhabitants in 1850 and had reached over
      5000 by about 1920. One of the major industrial disputes during the 19th century was
      the strike of 1893 when the Pinxton miners were out for 16 weeks. This led to much
      hardship. 200 children from Pinxton and Selston were taken into the homes of Hucknall
      miners during the strike. Collections were made in the whole district to alleviate the
      hardship. The general manager of the Pinxton Coal Company ( also a magistrate)
      comandeered 40 extra police and 60 dragoon guards into the village at one point. There
      was no violence and none was ever intended on the part of the men. Pinxton men were
      very active in the formation of the miners´union during the latter part of the 1800s.
      Among them were Joseph Hancock and his son John G Hancock and John Spiers. John G
      Hancock became agent for the Notts Miners Association and later MP for mid-Derbyshire.
      John Spiers became vice-president of the same Association.
      In 1905 work was started on the Coke Ovens and Tar distilleries and shortly afterwards
      , in 1908, the shaft of Brookhill collieriey was sunk nearby. The coke ovens were
      closed in 1955 and Brookhill colliery in 1968.
      Since then an industial estate has grown up on the site of the coke ovens and colliery.
      John King was a local man who invented the King patent safety device which prevented
      an overwind of the pit cage when men and coal were brought up the pit shaft. There is
      a small museum in his honour in the village.

      The village has been associated with the Coke family since 1558 when Richard Coke
      married Mary Sacheverel of Kirkby Old Hall. This Tudor Manor House was demolished in
      1963. The Rev D´Ewes Coke moved into Brookhill Hall in 1771 and the family lived there
      until the last lord of the manor, Roger Sacheverell Coke died in 1972. Roger Coke was
      a talented composer and a friend of Rachmaninov, who visited the Hall.
      The Rev D´Ewes Coke left a sum of pengar when he died in 1811 to buy books to enable
      the village children to learn to read. A school room was built in 1820. There was a
      schoolmaster in the village in 1841. Unfortunately he met with a nasty and fatal
      accident while visiting the Mill. In 1857 John Coke built a school at the bottom of
      Wharf Road. There was a boarding day school in Mill Lane. A new school was built at
      the junction of Wharf Rd and Alexander Terrace in 1879 and is still used today. The
      John King Infant School, also in use today, was built in 1903. The Kirkstead boys
      school was built in 1876 and the girls school in 1896.

      Methodism was very popular in the village and at one time there were four Methodist
      churches in the village. These were the Wharf United Free Methodist church, the
      Wesleyan chapel on Wharf Rd, the Slade Lane Primitive Methodist Chapel and the Town St
      Methodist Church. Of these only the Town St Methodist Church is left.
      ((www.methodist.org.uk/townst/). One of the prominent members of the Methodist church
      in Pinxton was Matthew Hayes. In 1913 there were 380 scholars at the Sunday School at
      the Wharf Methodist Chapel.
      The first parish church in Pinxton was built in the last decade of the 13th century
      and dedicated to St John. During the Commonwealth in the 17th century the name was
      dropped but renamed after St Helen in the 18th century. As the income for the
      clergymn was supplemented by income from glebe land he was, and still is, titled
      Rector and not Vicar.



     
  • Sources 
    1. [S01871] Hallam 18 Jan 02.GED, David Hallam.
      Date of Import: Jan 18, 2002

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